Classic Album: The Pogues’ “If I Should Fall From Grace With God”

On their first two efforts, Red Roses For You, and Rum, Sodomy, and The Lash, The Pogues established themselves as one of the most interesting, if novel, bands in post-punk London. The band, led by Shane McGowan, traded fuzzbox guitars for mandolins and pipes to create a sound as powerful as any, more “mainstream”, punk band ever did. On If I Should Fall From Grace With God, The Pogues moved from being rough and tumble, to being brilliant. Perhaps they knew this when they included an image of writer and fellow Irish ex-pat James Joyce, on the cover of the album.

The album opens with the title track, “If I Should Fall From Grace With God”. It explodes out of the gates like stallions in a horse race. Legs fly everywhere and the motion is a blur, but the lyrics bob above the fray to see it through. It is an empowering song about defiance in the face of death. “Turkish Song of The Damned” carries on this notion. There is no rest for the wicked as the next track, “Bottle of Smoke”, picks up on the momentum launched by the title track. It this case, the song is about a horse race. It is a profanity laden tale of money riding on hopes and dreams. But the next track on the album, stunned us all.

“Fairytale of New York” has become a modern standard. It is the story of recent Irish immigrants, a man and a woman, falling in love on the streets of New York. The song begins with our protagonist being led into the drunk tank on Christmas Eve. He reflects on the events leading up to that night. He had won a bet on a horse race (“Got on a lucky one/Came in eighteen to one”) and got wild with promises to his girl (as sung by the brilliant Kristy McColl). “This year’s for me and you/So happy Christmas/I love you baby/ I can see a better time/When all our dreams come true.” But with all highs, come the lows. The booze takes its natural course and the words of the drunken lovers become bitter.

Her: “You’re a bum/You’re a punk”

Him: “You’re an old slut on junk/Living there almost dead on a drip in that bed”

Like any great romantic story, there is some redemption at the end. The sparring calms and the couple opens up to one another about regrets and aspirations.

Him: “I could have been someone.”

Her: “So could anyone./You took my dreams from me when I first found you”

Him: “I kept them with me babe/I put them with my own/Can’t make it all alone/I’ve built my dreams around you.”

The rest of the album is very strong. No self-respecting drunken blowout would be complete without the rollicking Spanish themed “Fiesta” blasting late in the night. The Pogues also managed to include songs about the politics of Anglo-Irish relations (Birmingham Six, Streets of Sorrow) as well as the quiet contemplation of a Springtime stroll (Lullaby of London).

If I Should Fall From Grace With God was the artistic peak for The Pogues. Shane MacGowan’s drinking and erratic behavior grew worse and degraded the quality of his songwriting and vocals in the following years. Hells Ditch and Peace & Love were good but did not live up to the standard of If I Should Fall. At the wrap of Hell’s Ditch, MacGowan left the band (or was kicked out depending on which version you believe). The Pogues continued and released two mediocre albums, Waiting for Herb, and Pogue Mahone. They have since disbanded and reformed a couple of times. Shane MacGowan has released several solo albums but they pale in comparison to his work in the mid-80’s with The Pogues. Like most good things, quality is rarely duplicated. If I Should Fall From Grace With God is such a flash of artistic perfection that we shouldn’t expect another.

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